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Mum hits back at cruel strangers who criticised her daughter's birthmark

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CharlieKate
A mum has criticised strangers who stare and comment on her daughter's 'strawberry' birthmark.

Katie Crenshaw has hit back at people who have reacted cruelly towards her seven-month-old daughter's facial marking.

The mum-of-two, who also has a son Grayson, said that Charlie Kate's capillary hemangioma is no reason to 'pity' the infant.

Writing on her parenting blog Twelve and Six, Katie said; 'Charlie is Charlie and it's part of who she is. It doesn't need to be constantly commented on, critiqued, or questioned.'

A day in the sixties. âï¸

A photo posted by Katie | Twelve & Six Blog (@katiemcrenshaw) on



The pattern is approximately two inches wide and two inches long, and is caused by a capillary hemangioma, which her mother describes as 'insignificant as a freckle on her arm'.

The family, from Georgia, USA, have found that strangers commonly want to talk about Charlie's birthmark, Katie responded; 'I would much rather chat about her latest milestone achievement, her amazing smile, or how gorgeous her eyes are.

'It's a part of her unique beauty. It may never disappear, and guess what? It doesn't have to.'

Capillary hemangioma is an abnormal build up of blood vessels under the skin and there is no known reason or way to prevent this occurring, however it doesn't affect a person's health.

Hey guys, got anything else I can chew on?

A photo posted by Katie | Twelve & Six Blog (@katiemcrenshaw) on



Katie said; 'She isn't in pain or ill. She simply has an unusual quality about her appearance. Hold the pity. She's a healthy baby girl and we are blessed.'

The blogger is now trying to spread a wider message about bullying and instilling confidence in children, and believes that by having the mark cosmetically removed she would be doing her daughter an injustice.

The 'almost-thirty-something' was bullied herself at school even though there was 'nothing visibly wrong' and thinks values are more important than vanity in preventing bullying.

Continued below...




'I think to protect our children from bullies we should instill confidence and values in who they are, the way they were made. No one wants their child to be picked on, but children can be ruthless. They will pick on kids for their name, their brand of shoes, or the way they talk. It's just something that may or may not happen.'

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