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Week by week pregnancy guide: 30 weeks pregnant

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30 weeks pregnant
Now that you're 30 weeks, you'll be well used to a pregnancy week by week guide.

Here we reveal everything you need to know about being 30 weeks pregnant. Like you'll start to feel your baby move a lot more and you might be starting to have trouble sleeping.

There are other things to think about too, like how your baby is growing and developing and what you can be doing to keep dreaded heart burn at bay. Here's everything you need to know...

30 weeks pregnant: Symptoms

Your uterus is now 10cm above your belly button. You'll probably feel dramatic movements as your baby turns and gets comfortable, often giving you painful kicks under your ribcage. You'll probably want to wee a lot more now as your baby presses down on your bladder and your pelvic floor muscles become stretched. Your belly button may pop out, but it will go back to normal after the birth.

If you're suffering from heartburn, particularly at night time, then doctors will often recommend sleeping on a pile of pillows. The problem with this is it's not always as comfortable as it sounds and can result in back or neck ache. So instead of pillows, try putting bricks under the base of your bed to elevate it. Another tip is to make sure you eat your evening meal early and don't take too many fluids before you go to bed. Foods known to exacerbate heartburn are peppermint, spicy foods, caffeine and chocolate.

Are you up and down to the loo half the night? Is heartburn separating you from a good night's sleep? Or maybe junior's little foot is jabbing you in the ribs and make peaceful slumber hard to come by? Well, while it may be cold comfort, you are certainly not alone. Sleep deprivation is a common complaint in the third trimester. In fact studies suggest that 30% of pregnant women have broken sleep during the third trimester with 98% of them experiencing multiple night time awakenings.

30 weeks pregnant: Fetal development


Your baby will now measure about 39cm long and weigh about 2lbs 8oz. They are strong and active and you may find they are at their most lively at night time. Their wrinkly skin is getting smoother and the white, greasy vernix and the soft, protective coat of furry lanugo will start to disappear. Muscles, brain and lungs continue to mature and their skeleton is hardening. They're also doing some impressive peeing practice in your womb - around a pint a day, which your own kidneys recycle - in preparation for wetting around 2,400 nappies in their first two years!

30 weeks pregnant: The changes you should make

Your ligaments are now pretty stretchy, ideal for gently practising some labour and birth positions every day. Squatting is especially good - squatting to deliver your baby will encourage your pelvis to open and it also makes good use of gravity. Birthing balls are a great way to help strengthen your body during pregnancy and help prepare your body for birth. They can also help provide relief from some of the aches and pains of late pregnancy.

Continued below...


It's never too late to visit the labour ward at your hospital. If you've already been as part of a large group, it's a good idea to go again as a couple, because as you get closer to the birth you'll think of all sorts of other things you want to ask and find out about. Go with a written list of questions that are important to you. You may want to ask whether there are beanbags, birthing balls and floor cushions you can use. If not, is it OK to bring in your own? Are epidurals available at any time during the night and weekends? Will you have the same midwife with you throughout labour and delivery?

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