‘Hope to god you never own a pet again’ Fans slam Amy Childs for giving up her dog after the birth of baby Polly

Fans are slamming Amy Childs after the reality star revealed that she’s had to give up her dog following the birth of her daughter Polly.

Former The Only Way is Essex cast member Amy had owned bulldog Leo for three years before her daughter’s arrival, but noticed that he ‘got a bit jealous’ when she brought her baby home, and so took the decision to rehome him.

‘He’s been my baby for three years, but he was so big and got a bit jealous, and I have to put Polly first,’ she explained in her new! magazine column.

‘He has gone to a lovely couple who are my good friends. They have a beautiful house and a huge garden, and Leo absolutely loves it!’

However, the 26-year-old added that the process had not been an easy one: ‘It’s broken my heart, though. I can’t even visit him at the moment as I know I’ll get really upset and stressed. I know he’s happy, but I do miss him being around.’

Although Amy stresses that Leo has gone to a happy new home and that the move was in the best interests of her daughter, some of her followers have hit out at the decision, with one commenting on a recent Instagram post: ‘What a shame you got rid of your dog after having it 3 years. Hope to god you never own a pet again. Nasty cow.’

#mood this morning 😝

A post shared by Amy Childs (@amychilds1990) on

‘Wow getting rid of your dog because you’ve had a baby 😡😡 you wouldn’t get rid of your child so why is it ok to get rid of your dog of 3 years they are part of the family too!!’ another agreed.

‘Giving your dog away cause u have a baby SHAME on u 👊👊’ a third chimed in.

Charities such as the Dogs Trust recommend preparing a dog as early as possible for a baby’s impending arrival, as it can be unsettling, and suggest consulting a specialist if you have any concerns about their behaviour.

‘If you have any worries about your dog’s behaviour after the baby has arrived, consult your vet as soon as possible, who will refer you to a good local animal behaviourist,’ they advise.