‘I ain’t raisin’ no princesses’ Dad praised for penning powerful message on ‘rules’ for dating his daughters

A dad who penned a powerful message on Facebook has been praised on social media for going against the stereotype of the ‘creepy possessive’ dad and for encouraging his daughters to stand up for themselves.

Jeff Warren Welch, a dad of five who’s a poet and writer, posted the message on his Facebook page, where he often shares his work.

Captioning the post with ‘I ain’t raisin’ no princesses’, the dad from Tennessee, in the US, shared the letter entitled ‘Rules for dating my daughters’.

‘You’ll have to ask them what their rules are. I’m not raising my little girls to be the kind of women who need their daddy to act like a creepy possessive bad*** in order for them to be treated with respect’, the message read.

‘You will respect them, and if you don’t, I promise they won’t need my help putting you back in your place. Good luck pumpkin.’

The post, which quickly went viral, has been shared nearly 22,000 times and got more than 3,000 likes, and hit a major chord with many people who have taken to the comments section to applaud the dad for his important message.

‘We need more daddy’s like you!!!’, one wrote, while another commented: ‘I pity the fool who crosses either of your girls!’

Jeff Welch

Jeff Welch added a new photo.

The dad has five girls

A third wrote that even though quite a few people thought the dad meant ‘vengeful’ or ‘scary women’, she assumed he meant ‘women who care about the people in their life, but care about themselves enough to know that if you are hurting them, then you aren’t worth the investment’.

Mums of little boys also shared the same opinion, with one mum saying she is not raising a prince but a ‘respectful’ human.

‘I am a mum to a three year old wee man and I am not raising no Prince… I am however doing my best to raise a well adjusted, thoughtful, respectful human that can build strong positive relationships based on mutual respect’, she wrote.

And the dad also got praise from fellow dads, who agreed with his ‘rules’: ‘Right one DAD, from another dad!’