Kerry Katona breaks down in emotional video as daughter Molly leaves for Ireland

Kerry Katona has shared her heartbreak in an emotional social media video as her daughter Molly prepares to leave the family home.

In the clip, which the mum-of-five uploaded to her Instagram account, Kerry is seen cuddling her eldest child, whilst confessing her sadness that they won’t be living together anymore.

‘Still a mummies girl I’m in bits,’ she captioned the post.

‘My baby girl having cuddles with her mummy,’ Kerry says into the camera in the dimly-lit recording. ‘I don’t want her to leave. Don’t leave me Molly. She is, she’s leaving me – she’s abandoning me. I know I’m joking but I’m absolutely heartbroken.’

‘Don’t leave me, Molly, I’ve got abandonment issues,’ she continues, with a wry smile. ‘I love you, and I wish you all of the love and luck and happiness in the world. But don’t leave me!’

Molly, 15, is the eldest of Kerry’s children, and is moving to Ireland to live with her father Brian McFadden’s parents while she pursues her dream of becoming a surgeon.

Still a mummies girl I'm in bits

A post shared by Kerry Katona (@kerrykatona7) on

Kerry is also mum to Lily-Sue, 14, from her marriage to Brian, as well as Heidi, 10, and Max, nine, whom she shared with ex-husband Mark Croft. Her youngest is daughter Dylan-Jorge, from her relationship with George Kay, whom she recently split from after three years of marriage.

Her 76.2k followers rushed to send her messages of support after seeing her visible distress at Molly’s departure, with one writing: ‘Stay strong sweetheart. You have brought molly up well and she is a beautiful girl, she will always come back to her mummy.’

‘A wise women once told me, we gave them wings so watch them fly,’ another agreed. ‘My eldest is about to go to uni and although Part of me wants to beg her to stay, the over whelming pride I feel that she’s independent enough to do this is without me is so worth it😘’

Speaking to OK! magazine earlier this year, Kerry explained of her daughter’s decision: ‘She wants to get really good grades in her GCSEs so she’s going to Ireland to do a transition year. This will give her an extra year of biology and science. Molly wants extra knowledge – I am so proud of her.’

‘We sat down and talked about it. I told her that if she didn’t do it, she could live to regret it. I don’t want her to live a life full of regrets. If she doesn’t like it, she can come back home.’