Mum’s shock brain tumour diagnosis highlights the reason why all busy parents should make time to visit the doctor

A mum has opened up about her shock brain tumour diagnosis, admitting that previously she was ‘didn’t have time’ to see the doctor with her symptoms.

Despite experiencing crippling headaches, severe fatigue and a loss of hearing, Jeannie Gaffigan put her symptoms down to a far more common illness.

‘I figured I had the flu,’ she told WebMD magazine.

However, to Jeannie’s children’s doctor, her symptoms suggested something much more sinister. After noticing that Jeannie had a rattling cough during a routine check-up with her brood, her kids’ paediatrician decided to take a closer look at the mother-of-five before suggesting she should book in to see a ear, nose and throat specialist.

Jeannie took the advice on board and made an appointment. She was stunned when an MRI scan revealed she had a tumour the size of a tennis ball growing within her brain stem just days later.

According to Jeannie’s GP, Joshua Bederson, the 47-year-old may have died if she left seeking medical advice any longer – serving as a stark reminder that parents should take time out of their busy schedules to have their own health examined.

[instagram] https://www.instagram.com/p/BeOIrdcnMan/?hl=en&taken-by=jeanniegaffigan [/instagram] Her husband Jim Gaffigan has revealed he was terrified his partner might lose her life, leaving him to raise their little ones on his own.

‘Obviously, I selfishly wanted my wife to be OK because I love her. But I was also concerned about my children,’ the American stand-up comedian and writer said.

‘It’s one thing for them to go from super mom to klutzy dad. Then there were moments when I was like, ‘Oh. No. This might be it’.’

‘And if things went further south, the priority would be for me to be the continuity in my children’s lives. I knew I couldn’t do that and tour as a comedian and be an actor in films.’

He then went on to describe the relief he felt when the family learnt that the operation Jeannie underwent to have the tumour removed was a success.

‘When we finally got out of the woods, my obvious gratitude was about Jeannie. And also, it was, ‘OK. I could have lost this whole thing’.’ he added.