Mum whose cancer was dismissed as ‘breastfeeding pain’ dies from the condition

Louise Gleadell was diagnosed with incurable cervical cancer in 2016 despite repeatedly going to doctors about her concerns.

Knowing how to check your breasts for cancer or the signs and symptoms to look out for could save your life.

Mum-of-three Louise’s cervical cancer was misdiagnosed as ‘breastfeeding pain’ which meant that when it was finally diagnosed, the disease had spread. Louise has been raising awareness ever since her diagnosis in 2016 but she sadly passed away over Easter.

The 38-year-old’s family confirmed that she had passed away in an emotional post on social media. It read: ‘Our beautiful Louise passed away peacefully this morning surrounded by love. We are eternally grateful for all the love and support you all gave us over the last 2 years. Louise never ever gave up the fight- she did everything she possibly could to be here for as long as possible for her three boys.

‘She is at peace now, and free from all the pain and suffering. If we could kindly ask everyone to give us time as a family and we will update you all soon on further arrangements. Big, huge love to you.’

Four days before this, the family gave an update on Louise’s condition and revealed that her body could no longer cope with treatment. In her final days, Louise was surrounded by her family and her children and wanted to support them as much as possible.

Last year, Louise spoke to the Sun and revealed how her initial concerns were dismissed by doctors as side affects of breastfeeding. Despite several blood tests and cervical examinations, her cancer was not detected until it was too late.

Since the announcement, the post has received over 1,000 reactions and over 500 comments, with many sending their condolences to the family.

One person wrote: ‘There are no words. Love and strength to you all. Forever in our thoughts. RIP Louise xx’. Another said: ‘Such sad news, I’m so sorry sending you all love and thinking of you’.

You should see a GP if you notice: a lump in your breast or armpit; any other unusual changes in your breasts – such as the nipple turning inwards, dimpled skin or bloodstained nipple discharge.