Food critic sparks hilarious debate after describing mince on toast as a ‘British comfort classic’

A food critic who described mince on toast as a ‘British comfort classic’ was met with criticism on social media from many people who claim they’ve never even tried the dish.

The declaration came from online food publication Eater, who tweeted about the latest episode of their video series The Meat Show. In the episode, host Nick Solares – who’s actually British but based in New York – visits London restaurant Quality Chop House, where he had the meal in question.

Posting on Twitter about the video, the publication wrote: ‘Watch: Mince meat on toast is a quintessential British comfort classic.’

However, foodies everywhere were unhappy with the declaration, saying they never even heard about the dish and it’s in no way a classic.

One user said: ‘Never ever ever ever ever, ever ever in a month of Sundays ever ever has anyone in Britain eaten this mess’, while another wrote: ‘No British person has ever eaten this.’

https://twitter.com/thejamessutton/status/884477195917373441

A third agreed: ‘I’ve eaten some shite in my time but this….!?, and a fourth commented: ‘Clearly mixed up Shepherds Pie and Beans on Toast. Next week it’ll be baked beans on mash…’

However, a few lone defenders did say that they’ve had the delicacy before, claiming it’s a traditional dish in the North East of England.

One said: ‘My granddad used to cook it for us as kids. Not had it in years but fancy some now.’

While another Twitter user wrote: ‘It’s a classic North East dish, in the UK. IT’s a British classic dish.’

A third also said they used to eat when they were younger: ‘we used to be given it as a ‘treat’ when the grown ups had chilli – still prefer it to chilli.’

Some users also offered clarification on the origin of the dish, saying that
it seems to be a typical New Zealand dish and not from the UK.

‘Pretty sure this is a New Zealand dish’, one user wrote.

Following the criticism, Eater tweeted: ‘Forgive us. It’s more accurate to say it’s a quintessentially British dish, rather than a British *classic*’

What do you think of the mince debate? A classic or not even British? Let us know in the comments!