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Hairy Bikers' Cornish pasty

(268 ratings)

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Hairy Bikers' The People's Cornish Pasty
Hairy Bikers' The People's Cornish Pasty
  • Serves: 6

  • Prep time:

  • Cooking time:

  • Total time:

  • Skill level: Bit of effort

  • Costs: Cheap as chips

The Hairy Bikers' delicious Cornish pastry recipe, which is from their brilliant 'Food Tour of Britain' TV show is warming, filling and delicious. Learn how to make your own pastry and fill with the traditional Cornish filling with this easy-to-make recipe. Perfect for picnics, parties or just a nice lunch with the family. This recipe makes 6 Cornish pasties and will take around 1hr and 10 mins to prepare and cook. This hearty classic is sure to become a family favourite and keep everyone happy and full when it comes to eating them. If you have any leftover pasties, leave to cool thoroughly and then store wrapped in clingfilm in the fridge.

Ingredients

Pasty:
  • 450g plain flour
  • 2tsp baking powder
  • 1tsp salt
  • 125g unsalted butter
  • 2 egg yolks
  • 125ml cold water

Cornish pasty filling:

  • 450g potato, finely diced
  • 150g swede, finely diced
  • 150g onion, finely chopped
  • 300g beef skirt, finely chopped
  • Salt and black pepper
  • 1tbsp plain flour
  • 40g butter
  • 1 egg, beaten

Top tip: Want to know if shin or brisket is the best cut for stewing? John Torode answers your beef cooking questions.

Method

  1. To make the pastry: Place the flour, baking powder, salt, butter and egg yolks into a food processor and blitz until the mixture forms crumbs. Slowly add the water until a ball of pastry miraculously appears - you may not need all the water. Wrap the pastry in clingfilm and leave it to chill in the fridge for an hour.
  2. To prepare the Cornish pasty filling: Preheat the oven to 180C (gas mark 4). Roll out the pastry to the thickness you like, but be careful not to tear it. Using a dinner plate as a template, cut out 6 discs of pastry.
  3. Season the vegetables separately with salt and black pepper. Put the beef into a bowl and mix with the flour and some salt and pepper. Place some potatoes, swede, onions and beef on one half of the circle, leaving a gap round the edge. Dot with butter. Brush around the perimeter of the pastry circle with the beaten egg, then fold the pastry over the vegetables and meat and seal firmly. Starting at one side, crimp the edges over to form a sealed D-shaped pasty. Brush the whole pasty with beaten egg, then make a steam hole in the centre with a sharp knife.
  4. Repeat to make the other pasties. Put the pasties in the oven and cook for 50 mins until they are crispy and golden and the filling is cooked through. Leave them to rest for 5-10 mins before eating.

This recipe is from The Hairy Biker's Food Tour of Britain, 20 from Weidenfeld & Nicolson whic is available from Amazon.

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Average rating

  • 4
(268 ratings)

Your comments

PIssed off and out

Fucking ads and tinkly music at top volume. This page SUCKS THE BIG ONE. Learn UI you fuckjtarsdsfas.mfds.

Jp

Noooooooo ! A pasty can only contain beef , potatoe , swede , onion , salt pepper Anything else and it's a pie !!!!

Barry

chefs ... maybe not, but they certainly are good cooks! This is what counts, and also whether their recipes are as close as possible to genuine ..... this is quite close to traditional, and certainly very nice!

BearTypeBuddy

First time I've tried making anything like this - I thought the filling was lovely, if a little dry (but that could be because I used beef mince), but the pastry felt a bit 'chewy' while I was rolling it out. Fresh out of the oven the first pasty was lovely but going back to reheat a couple about 12 hours later it was quite solid and tasted a bit floury. I admit that I've only ever made short crust pastry before and that can be hit and miss so it could just be me. I also think that they could have done with 5 mins les cooking time as they were very 'golden' ;) I will definitely make these again though, although I might try different pastry recipes until I find one I'm happy with. If anyone has any tips to improve my pastry please let me know?

matt

Dont want to make pastys forever.. what happens when i run out of ingredients?

paul

it means the same thing.... :)

cornishbird

please try the Pasty Association recipe for a proper cornish pasty as, much as I love these guys, this recipe is not authentic and tastes nothing like it should - the pastry should always be made with strong plain flour as it needs to be elastic to stretch over the filling - it takes a bit more effort but I think it's worth it.

Kate and Daughter Erin

We really enjoyed making these and when we tasted them they were really nice! Must of done something right!!! Tip if you have no swede put carrots and parsnips in, that's what we did!!!

Cycling Dawn

I made 10 of these but with mince . I was going to freeze them but I left house to walk dog came home and all gone . I never had one but going on the plea to make more from other half and daughter I would say they great. As for hard pastry mine was not. Think the person who said that should check there oven temp as that might be to high .

Michelles Reborns

Chefs even lol

Michelles Reborns

Actually the hairy bikers are not chiefs.. dave is a make up artist for big and small screen and si a location manager for the bbc..

Sue Burville

my Q 2 you smart ppl "what did you do with ur egg whites?" lm going 2 mahe you and see what happens and when l do l'll put on my fb pb at "whangarei cooking school". these guys are chef's and 1 thing you all must think is using common sense always when cooking.

MagpieMagic

Great recipe. I couldn't find skirt so I used just normal stewing steak but they were fab anyway and the pastry was amazing, felt like pasta pastry when I rolled it out and was really nice and flaky when done.

gjs414

I think swardy is talking nonsense. If you made the pastry correctly you would have found that it was heavenly soft and not even close to dry concrete. You either didn't make the pastry properly or you cooked it incorrectly. To have a soft pastry that is still robust enough to hold a pasty together is great, and I thank you gents for sharing this amazing pastry recipe.

swardy

This recipe is really poor. Sorry boys because we love you both. 50 minutes in the oven turns them into concrete. I followed the recipe to the letter and we were all so very disappointed. They were so dry as well. I would have thought baking pastry for 50 minutes could never be a good idea. Try the Bero Recipe book for a much better version of a classic. These are a waste of your time and money.

maggie

I watched the Hairy bikers make these other nite and looked good i havent used skirt i got some beef already sliced and cut it smaller so once they are cooked will let you know how they are

Belinda

Beef skirt CAN be tough, but that's good, if you are using it to make Beef Jerky. In THIS recipe, it is finely chopped, therefore it wouldn't BE tough, as it's just this side of mince. If you want to use larger pieces of beef in your Pasty, as I like to do, then you need to go with a more tender cut, such as Rib-eye. If you don't want to shell out huge money for Rib-eye, but want a tender cut, ask your butcher what they recommend on the day, after all, it's their business to know! (I was also going to suggest dividing the pastry into six pieces and flattening each piece into a disk before wrapping individually and chilling, that way: it chills faster, you don't waste any pastry as any uneven bits on the edges of the circle are worked into the crimping, and it's easier to roll out from a disk than it is from a ball.)

David

I just watched the episode and contrary to A. McCraigs comment they do use "skirt" steak. They also made a point of mentioning that they did not poach any ingredients.

A. McCaig

Intersting this recipe gives "skirt" instead of the rib-eye steak of the original programme. Readers should be aware that beef skirt is considerably tougher than rib-eye and may need pre-cooking to make it tender enough. I always use rib-eye as it gives a better result.

James Weinstock

Just dropped by across this site and found more interested on the topic about Cornish Pasties. Thank you very much for sharing your reviews.

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