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Skin problems: Ask the experts

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Adult woman with spots, bad skin, acne
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We all suffer from bouts of bad skin every now and then - but if your skin problems are getting you down, it's time to take action. 

We've teamed up with our sister magazines, Woman and Chat to get their experts to answer your questions on skin problems. So whether it's an outbreak of spots, eczema, psoriasis, acne, rashes or something else - Dr Chris and Dr Martin have the answers.  

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The problem: 'I want to cure my psoriasis'

I think I've got psoriasis on my face and eyelids. It looks terrible. Are there any creams available that are safe to use in this area?

Dr Chris says: First, see your GP to confirm that you do actually have psoriasis - a condition that's difficult to treat. You could try an over-the-counter, mild steroid cream that may help (but mustn't be used on the face for a prolonged time). If it helps in the short term, tell your GP, who'll decide on the best long-term treatment.

The problem: 'My acne agony'

I'm 32 and have acne. I've tried everything, including Roaccutane. My hormone levels are normal and I don't have PCOS. What else can I try?

Dr Chris says: I'm glad you mention PCOS (polycystic ovarian syndrome), as this would have been my first question. You've obviously seen an expert, because you've been prescribed Roaccutane, a powerful anti-acne treatment. Try contacting one of the UK's leading specialists, Dr Anthony Chu, via www.acnesolutions.co.uk. He may have some better ideas.

The problem: 'I've still got spots'

I'm 34 and I've got spots. My doctor said going on the Pill might clear up my skin, but it hasn't. What can I do?

Dr Chris says: Teenage spots tend to lessen by the early 20s as the hormonal surges of adolescence settle down. Some women over 25 with acne may be suffering from polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). However, if PCOS is the problem, cysts in your ovaries disturb the sex hormone balance and produce acne, excess hair (especially facial), obesity, infrequent or missed periods and difficulty conceiving. You need to be investigated - have another chat with your GP.

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