Experts warn Kate Middleton over harmful ‘mum-hunch’

Experts have warned Kate Middleton over a condition known as ‘mum-hunch’, which could be harmful if left untreated.

The Duchess of Cambridge welcomed her third child, Prince Louis, last year, and it seems that having three little ones could be having an impact on her posture.

Kate was seen walking with slumped shoulders, her head forward, tailbone tucked under – usually known as ‘mum posture’ or ‘mum hunch’ – during recent royal events, which could lead to several health problems like headaches, neck and back pain, and even lower levels of energy.

Credit: REX/Shutterstock

READ MORE: Prince Louis might lose his place as the youngest of the Cambridge children soon…

Speaking to Fabulous online, physiotherapist James Turgis explained that it all starts during pregnancy, but it can get worse post partum when mums are busy looking after their babies.

He said: ‘The more the baby grows, the more the gravity centre of the mother is going forward.

‘To compensate, the mum will start to arch her lower back. To keep her eyes on the horizon, she will roll her shoulders and will also use a different back muscle to adapt.

‘When your body has adapted to that posture – which you’ve had for nine months during pregnancy – you tend to keep this posture for a while.

Credit: REX/Shutterstock

‘The fact that you’ve had a certain posture for nine months means some of your muscles will be weaker, so if you increase the use of certain muscles that aren’t yet strong enough by carrying a baby on your front or on your hip, or if you arch you back when feeding, you’ll maintain this posture.

In order to correct or prevent mum posture, the NHS recommends that mums make sure their back is well supported while feeding by putting a small pillow or cushion behind your waist to support your lower back; always change nappies on a raised surface or kneel on the floor next to a sofa or bed; and always bend your knees instead of bending your back.

Another helpful tips for new mums is to keep your back straight when you push your pram or buggy or carry your baby in a well-fitting sling.