Why Meghan Markle’s thumb could indicate she will have an ‘earlier’ and ‘easier’ birth

Meghan Markle is only a few weeks away from becoming a mum for the first time, and her thumb (yes, you read that right) might be giving us an important clue as to what type of delivery she's in for.

The expectant mum is due sometime in spring, as it was announced back in October.

The statement read at the time: ‘Their Royal Highnesses The Duke and Duchess of Sussex are very pleased to announce that The Duchess of Sussex is expecting a baby in the Spring of 2019.

‘Their Royal Highnesses have appreciated all of the support they have received from people around the world since their wedding in May and are delighted to be able to share this happy news with the public.’

Credit: REX/Shutterstock

But now it’s been revealed that she might actually give birth earlier than her expected due date and it’s all down to her bendy thumbs.

READ MORE: Meghan Markle’s due date could have a very special significance to the royal family

In pictures taken while she was out for a royal engagement at the National Theatre Duchess last month, the Duchess seems to have double-jointed fingers.

This could mean that Meghan’s joints are hypermobile – genetic condition that allows her to move the digits – and probably other parts of her body – beyond the normal range, without it hurting.

Credit: REX/Shutterstock

Speaking to Fabulous digital, Dr Adam Taylor – who’s an expert in anatomy at Lancaster Medical School – said the condition helps people who, like Meghan, practice yoga and could mean she has an easier birth.

He told the publication: ‘The ligaments of the pelvis, which help hold the pelvis together, are believed to loosen over pregnancy.

‘So any more mobility within these from having hypermobility may help make delivery easier too.’

READ MORE: How Meghan Markle’s pregnancy could influence her relationship with Kate Middleton

According to another expert, birth coach Alexandra Kremer, this could also mean Meghan will welcome her baby earlier than expected.

She said: ‘If you’re already hypermobile, then pregnancy can take more of a toll on you and your body.

‘It’s not uncommon to have issues with pelvic girdle pain and in more extreme cases it could cause premature labour.

‘Due to how fragile the connective tissue can be, hypermobility has shown that there can be a connection with early labour.’

Apester Lazyload