This shocking video shows what it’s like to be a child struggling with dyslexia

"I'm still in shock..."
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  • A therapist has shared a video showing what it's like to struggle with dyslexia in the classroom.

    Lindsay Fleming, who is a licensed therapist for children and teenagers and a dyslexia sufferer, shared the viral footage on social media to help people understand what trying to learn with dyslexia can feel like.

    Posting a video of a passage of text with the letters and words constantly moving around, Lindsay challenged her followers to read the page.

    The post attracted lots of attention from parents of children with dyslexia, thanking Lindsay for showing them what their little one faces on a daily basis.

    This is a simulation of what it feels like to be dyslexic. Dyslexia is a spectrum and can vary in severity and presentation! Again this is a simulation. I felt many people believe dyslexia is writing letters backwords.

    With the letters moving instead of backwards I felt it represents what it can feel like when I am reading,’ she penned beside the upload.

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    This is a simulation of what it feels like to be dyslexic. Dyslexia is a spectrum and can vary in severity and presentation! Again this is a simulation. I felt many people believe dyslexia is writing letters backwords. With the letters moving instead of backwards I felt it represents what it can feel like when I am reading. I am not a specialist in dyslexia, just someone who has it. The letters do not actually move for someone who is dyslexic. Hope this helps spread awareness for many of us who suffered silently not knowing others had felt like I had. – – Let me know if you want to learn more & I can continue to post on this topic! – – – “Developmental dyslexia is the most common learning disability and affects somewhere between 5–10% of the population, with some estimates as high as 17%. It is a language-based learning disability. Contrary to popular belief, the core indicator of dyslexia is not reversing letters; rather it is a difficulty interpreting the sound (phonological) components of our language.” From: http://dyslexiahelp.umich.edu/dyslexics/learn-about-dyslexia/what-is-dyslexia #heylinds #dyslexia #dyslexic #dyslexiaawareness #dyslexiaeducation #mentalheathawareness #therapist #anxiety #adhd

    A post shared by Lindsay Fleming | Therapist (@lindsay_fleminglpc) on

    I am not a specialist in dyslexia, just someone who has it. The letters do not actually move for someone who is dyslexic. Hope this helps spread awareness for many of us who suffered silently not knowing others had felt like I had,’ she added.

    Dyslexia sufferers and parents of children with dyslexia took to the comment section to thank Lindsay for spreading awareness of the condition.

    Thank you. This is the first time I’ve been in my child’s shoes and now I can see how frightening the whole reading experience is for him. Please post more about dyslexia for I’d love to learn in depths about it. Thanks again for the simulation. I’m still in shock,’ one wrote.

    Thanks for sharing this! My child was diagnosed with dyslexia at 7 and this gave me a glimpse of their struggle to read,’ added another.

    Couldn’t love this more! My daughter has dyslexia! Thank you for this post! ❤️❤️,’ a third grateful mother chipped in.