Mum shares warning over black henna tattoos after sons are left with chemical burns

Toni Feeney allowed her sons to get a henna tattoo on holiday but is now warning other parents against doing so after her sons developed severe chemical burns.

If you’re taking your little ones on holiday you might be tempted to allow them to get one of the temporary or henna tattoos you often see being offered on the beach or in top tourist hotspots.

However, mum-of-two Tori’s account might make you reconsider after her children were left with serious chemical burns and in need of both antibiotics and antihistamines to make a full recovery.

Writing on Facebook Tori explained: ‘This is what black henna can do to your skin! We let our children have them on holiday not thinking for a second it would be dangerous.’

She added: ‘The hospital have said that the chemicals/dyes in black henna are too strong. They now have chemical burns and are on antibiotics and antihistamines in the hope that they don’t get infection or get poorly.’

Tori pleaded: ‘If you are offered it say NO!’

The post has already received more than 200 shares and Tori is desperate to spread the warning to as many parents as possible so that they don’t have to go through the same trauma.

One person wrote: ‘OMG your poor boys, hope they heal quickly. These places should be banned, I’ve heard from a friend who had one of these years ago that she reacted but she also reacts very badly to every hair dye she tries. These places should be shut down, how many kids have to suffer before someone steps in. Sending you all lots of love x’.

Another said: ‘Omg this is shocking poor kids x’.

While a third shared a similar experience, alongside a picture of their child they wrote: ‘We made a similar mistake allowing our son to have henna tattoo a few weeks back in Thailand. Never again!’

Warren Flatt

Warren Flatt added a new photo.

Tori thanked everyone for their kind messages and reiterated that she had no idea how dangerous it was and wants to help as many people as possible.

She said: ‘Thanks everyone, just wanted to make everyone aware as we didn’t have a clue it was dangerous xx’.

Tori spoke with The Independent and confirmed that both sons were recovering well.

The NHS warn against black henna tattoos and state that you should approach shops or stalls offering the service with caution.

The website explains: ‘The black paste used in these temporary tattoos may contain high levels of a chemical dye so powerful and toxic that it is illegal to use it on the skin in this way…

‘Although PPD can lawfully be used in hair dyes in the EU, this use is strictly controlled.’

Real henna is normally orange in colour with a red or brown tint. Dr Chris Flower, director general of the Cosmetic, Toiletry and Perfumery Association, suggests that you should be suspicious of black ‘tattoos’ and approach them with caution.