Rob Delaney announces his wife is pregnant five months after they tragically lost their son

Rob Delaney has announced that his wife Leah is expecting a baby, after they tragically lost their two-year-old son in January.
Rob Delaney has announced that his wife Leah is expecting a baby, after they tragically lost their two-year-old son in January.
The dad revealed the news on Twitter, while sharing a video of himself praising the NHS and calling for better healthcare in the US, where he’s originally from.

Speaking about his experience with the NHS in the UK, Rob said: ‘Just had 2 typically wonderful @NHSEnglandLDN midwives visit my pregnant wife & I for a home birth assessment. Love to all marching for the NHS today. See my sad love letter to the NHS below.’

The actor, famed for his role in Channel 4’s sitcom Catastrophe, said that the NHS spared him and his family from financial stress during the though times they experienced when they were grieving.

Fans were quick to congratulate him on the lovely baby news, with many sharing their own experiences of expecting a little one after losing a child, and also how much the NHS has meant to them over the years.

One said: ‘Congratulations and love – our daughter was born 10 months after our son’s unexpected death and we could not have done it without the NHS.’

Another wrote, alongside a picture of his little boy: ‘Lost one thru miscarriage on the wife’s birthday, lost the next thru stillbirth. The NHS paid for Alexander’s funeral. In a less burden and a while lot of support gave is this little monkey. Oliver would like to wish the NHS a happy 70th birthday, they are why he is here!’

The news comes nearly six months since the couple – who share two other boys – lost their son, two-year-old Henry.

The little boy sadly passed away after fighting a brain tumour since he was diagnosed in 2016, when he had just turned one.

He wrote on Facebook at the time: ‘I have very sad news. My two and a half year year old son Henry has passed away. Henry had been diagnosed with a brain tumor in 2016, shortly after his first birthday, following persistent vomiting and weight loss. He had surgery to remove the tumor and further treatment through the early part of 2017. Then the cancer returned last autumn and he died in January.

‘My wife and Henry’s older brothers and I are devastated of course. Henry was a joy. He was smart, funny, and mischievous and we had so many wonderful adventures together, particularly after he’d moved home following fifteen months living in hospitals.’