Prince Harry and Meghan Markle’s son Archie could be ‘trapped’ in US due to 40-year-old law

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  • Prince Harry and Meghan Markle's son Archie could end up "trapped" in the United States if the couple disagree on where he should be raised.


    Harry and Meghan have been living in Los Angeles since they announced they’d be taking a break from royal life earlier this year, and, despite still having Frogmore Cottage in Windsor Castle, the couple seem like they’ll stay in the States for good.

    But now, royal expert Lady Colin Campbell has suggested having Archie become a resident of the USA could mean Prince Harry would be in trouble if he and Meghan decide to separate in the future.

    In her webcast, Chatting with Lady C, the royal commentator said: “If anybody’s marital home is in England and they get divorced or separated, the child is required to remain in England until it is 18 save by the consent of the parties concerned.

    “The same applies in America, in France, in any of the tremendous numbers of countries who are signatories to the Hague Convention.

    READ MORE: Royal expert reveals when Prince Harry and Meghan Markle first considered royal split

    “That means that once Meghan moved Harry and the baby to America, if they set up operations in America, and there is a separation and/or divorce, unless Meghan agrees to the baby coming back to live in England, the baby is trapped in America until he is 18.”

    She added: “The Hague Convention trumps everything else.”

    The Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction – which actually “shall cease to apply when the child attains the age of 16 years” rather than 18, as Lady Campbell said – was created in 1980 to make sure children taken abroad from one parent without the consent of the other parent are returned promptly.

    The law means a separated parent can only relocate their child in another country with the permission of their former partner.