‘It’s like there’s a tyre around my body’ Charlotte Crosby opens up about living with rare condition symmastia

Charlotte Crosby has revealed that she has symmastia, a rare condition which affects the area between her breasts.

During a joint interview with boyfriend Stephen Bear, Charlotte told OK! magazine that the condition had often left her feeling ‘self-conscious’ about her cleavage.

‘It’s known as the “uniboob”, but the actual term is symmastia,’ the former Geordie Shore star detailed to the mag.

‘Where there’s normally a gap, I’ve got a fold of skin. It’s like there’s a tyre around my body.’

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‘It’s normally what happens when a boob job goes wrong,’ she went on to explain. ‘The breast tissue expands from the boob job, and makes you not have the gap in your cleavage.

‘But I haven’t had a boob job – I was one of the few unlucky people born with it’.

Charlotte has lost over three stone in recent years, and appears to have become more confident in her body as a result, but her ‘uniboob’ does still cause limitations when it comes to showing off her figure.

The 26-year-old, who has a fashion range for online store In The Style, said that her symmastia meant that she often required outfits to be adapted: ‘I can’t wear low-cut things with a deep V.’

‘When I’m designing my clothing collection, the team have all these beautiful ideas where it’s low cut, and I’m like “I can’t wear it.” We always have to move the slit up.

‘It didn’t used to bother us and I did used to wear the low cut things, but I got so many bad comments,’ she added, saying that the question she got most often was ‘What’s happened to her boobs?!’

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‘I don’t know whether I’d get it changed, but I’ve been doing a lot of research,’ she concluded.

‘It’s not a big operation; they just do a little split, then they get the tissue lifted from the breast bone and stitch it up, so that you’ve got that groove that you’re meant to have.’