What is the Mayr Method diet? How Rebel Wilson lost three stone

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  • It’s the secret behind Rebel Wilson’s amazing weight loss, but what exactly is the Mayr Method?

    There’s a new diet plan in town; the Mayr Method is the regime behind actress Rebel Wilson’s recent three stone weight loss.

    Straight from Austria, there are Mayr clinics around the globe, and they’re loved by a multitude of celebrities including Rebel herself, Rita Ora and models Karlie Kloss and Suki Waterhouse.

    But what is this interesting method and why is it so loved?

    What is the Mayr Method?

    Although a Mayr Method program isn’t primarily about weight loss, shedding unwanted pounds is pretty likely.

    Daniel Herman is a Nutrition Coach at bio-synergy.uk. He explains: ‘The Mayr Method Diet, is a mixture of common sense such as taking your time to chew and avoiding snacking, whilst drinking plenty of water (except around meal times). It also include some new thinking around balancing the body’s acidity by eating more raw, alkaline foods, except after 4pm, after which it is suggested that it can lead to gas as not being properly digested.’

    Why the chewing? It gives your digestion less work to do as the food that passes through has already been broken down. It also allows you to really taste and notice your food; a bit like mindful eating. The reason for no raw food after 4pm, is again, to give your digestion a break. As your digestive process slows down over the course of the day, by evening, you want it to be doing as little work as possible.

    Smoothies are factored into this and one small cup is allowed. It’s all about small doses!

    ‘There is also a lot of emphasis on smelling food as a means of getting the digestive juices flowing to help better metabolise the incoming meal,’ adds Dan.

    Added to this, Dan explains that the Mayr Method also advocates breakfast as the largest meal of the day and encourages a balanced plate. At Viva Mayr itself, dinner is served at 5pm.

    The balanced plate means proteins, carbs and fats although limited carbs in the evening. As for snacking, it’s a big no!

    What can you eat on the Mayr Method?

    This isn’t a program that bans foods and expects you to live off dust. But at the clinic itself, you  follow a fairly rigid eating plan. If you’re doing the plan yourself however, there is in fact a recipe book with some tasty looking meals; Eat Alkaline: The Viva- Mayr- Principle, includes recipes such as potato strudel, and Moist Poppyseed cake.

    OK, so nothing totally ordinary, but still, edible. As the title of the book suggests, alkaline foods for the win!

    At Viva Mayr, a typical day could include quinoa porridge or spelt bread for breakfast, vegetable soup, fish and green vegetables for lunch and then a light and easily digestible dinner such as fish, soup and/or cooked vegetables.

    Gluten and dairy is avoided on the method. As are heavily processed and low-fat foods.

    The method also says that one coffee a day at breakfast is fine, however after this, herbal teas are best.

    When it comes to other fluids, at Viva Mayr, cold drinks such as water are drunk away from mealtimes. Drinking within an hour before mealtimes and within an hour of finishing a meal, is discouraged as liquid is said to dilute digestive juices, therefore disrupting the digestion process.

    Good news though; an occasional glass of wine with a meal is OK. Just keep it to one glass! Added to this, water can be drunk between meals, instead of snacking on food. Remember, no snacks!

    Will this diet work for you?

    Dan says: ‘Overall the Mayr Method is common sense and is nothing new as there are already many sayings including, ‘breakfast like a king and dinner like a pauper’.’

    He adds that as it’s mostly common sense. Plus, it doesn’t involve food restriction or counting calories, ‘it should for most people be something that can be followed and adhered to.’

    What’s more, the Mayr Method provides a structure. It aims to discourage snacking and focuses on eating a balance of nutrients, so it should take the edge off cravings and make meals more satisfying.