Nicolas Cage and Erika Koike have divorced after a four-day marriage

Hollywood actor Nicolas Cage and his fourth wife Erika Koike have officially divorced after a four-day marriage.

The former couple were granted the divorce three months after their wedding ceremony, which they had tried to annul after just four days. Nicolas had claimed he was ‘too drunk’ to marry.

According to court records, Clark County judge granted the divorce on May 31st.  The 55-year-old claimed his union to Erika was ‘based on fraud’, as she hadn’t told him about her criminal record and a relationship with another person.

The two were spotted having a heated discussion outside the Ballagio hotel in Las Vegas just hours after their wedding on March 23rd.

According to TMZ, Nicolas was unable to get the annulment but did get a quick divorce.

Cage has previously been married to Patricia Arquette, Lisa Marie Presley (pictured) and Alice Kim. His marriage to Elvis Presley’s only daughter Lisa was widely publicised at the time.

Credit: REX/Shutterstock

34-year-old Erika has spoken out about the marriage, claiming her reputation has been ‘damaged’ by him and she has lost out on career opportunities as a result. She is known for her makeup work on Finnish short horror film Hankikanto (2012).

Erika and Nicolas had been dating for about a year before marrying in Vegas. The couple tied the knot the same day they applied for a marriage licence. But while there, eyewitnesses claim the actor ‘made a scene’ and appeared to be ‘very out of it’.

He later claimed he was ‘too drunk’ to realise he was getting married, and was disturbed to find out about Erika’s DUI convictions along with her arrest for domestic violence in 2006.

Cage’s lawyers claimed that both he and Erika were drunk at the time of the marriage. ‘Prior to obtaining a marriage license and participating in a marriage ceremony, Cage and Koike were both drinking to the point of intoxication.

‘As a result of his intoxication, when Koike suggested to Cage that they should marry, he reacted on impulse and without the ability to recognize or understand the full impact of his actions.’