Woman discovers health condition after spotting something in her wedding photo

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  • Your wedding day is one of the biggest moments in your life, and there’s always photos to look back on. But one woman spotted something awful in her wedding photo.

    Madeleine Kyrke-Smith revealed that she spotted her own breast cancer in a photograph, and issued a warning to other women.

    Years before her wedding, she noticed a lump in her breast but was told it wasn’t cancerous at the time.

    However, photos of her big day revealed that the lump had grown so big it was visible in her wedding dress.

    Taking to Facebook, Madeleine explained the story and warned others about the signs.

    She said, ‘The day after we got this photo I found out that the lump right there was actually breast cancer, it was so big you can see it.

    ‘I have my last chemo infusion on Friday and am having a double mastectomy in July. I have no idea how much of this treatment could have been avoided, but it was misdiagnosed 3 years ago so I’m gonna say probably a fair bit.’

    Maddie Kyrke-Smith

    The day after we got this photo I found out that the lump right there was actually breast cancer, it was so big you can see it. I have my last chemo infusion on Friday and am having a double…

    She added, ‘It was misdiagnosed because most lumps in young women’s breasts are not cancer and because best practice for biopsies was not followed.’

    Madeleine listed some of the key things she thinks women need to know about if they discover a lump.

    Read more: The often undetected heath risk affecting women in their 30s

    She wrote, ‘1 – a cancerous lump in a 30 year old boob will feel different and move differently than a cancerous lump in an older boob. Just because it moves, doesn’t mean it isn’t cancer

    2 – you generally can’t get mammograms as the tissue is too dense and ultrasounds don’t give you a full picture, you need an MRI

    3 – insist on a guided core-needle biopsy, a fine-needle aspiration is not good enough and is not best practice.’

    She concluded by revealing that she had made an official complaint, but she was ‘on her way to a full recovery and feeling great’.